Joseph Guay

Joseph Guay (born November 6, 1971) is an American fine art painter, sculptor, large-scale photographer, and film director. Born in Lewiston, Maine to parents of French-Canadian descent. Guay resides in Atlanta, Georgia while working in Los Angeles, New York City, and London. Guay’s visual art focuses on political and social issues.

His politically charged exhibition of paintings and sculptures titled "Remnants of the Human Condition" paid tribute to Trayvon Martin, Alton Sterling, Eric Garner, Pulse Nightclub, Sandy Hook Elementary, the World Trade Center, the Boston Marathon Bombings and the Dallas Police Officer Shootings. With the exhibition, "DUEL // DUAL" Guay explored the two sides and battles of our sociological and political climate. The series featured photographs and sculptures diving into the production and disarmament of weapons; paintings made from motor oil, shattered high-rise glass and gunpowder dealing with terrorism and the alternative reasons for war; sculptures created from live round ammunition and handguns revealing the hidden truths of consumer protection and fear. As an outdoor interactive sculpture to accompany the exhibition, Guay constructed “The Border Wall”, made completely by hand using only undocumented Mexican labor workers. The structure was built from welded steel, rebar and concrete, 40 feet in length by 16 feet tall, weighing over 40,000 pounds. It is modeled after the proposed $20 billion wall for the Mexico / United States border. The purpose of this installation was to allow views to write and express their feelings of immigration on the wall and create social awareness around the issues surrounding immigration in the United States. The sculpture received international coverage and press, including CNN.

In his latest public installation "Missed Attendance" Guay painted vintage school desks with chalkboard paint and placed them in the center of the "March for Our Lives" demonstration. Students, Adults, Children and Politicians all wrote their views of Gun Control and School Violence on the desks with white chalk. Protesters left their mark on the school desks to make their voices permanent and their thoughts of change forever imprinted in Art. The installation was in honor of the 14 Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students that will never get to sit in a classroom again.